CPC Deputy Guber-aspirant, Dr.Sebastian Mezu takes INEC to Court.

Barely 48 hours to the supplementary elections in Mbaitaoli, Ngor Okpala, Orji and Oguta, CPC pulls another publicity stunt. CPC Deputy Gubernatorial aspirant, Dr. Sebastin O. Mezu has taken INEC to court. The Petition, dated May 3, 2011 is seeking a restraining order and permanent injuction against holding the May 6th elections.

My question is, how does this particular  election concern CPC in Imo State? Its not like they are still in the Gubernatorial race so, how is it their business ?

The 3rd runner up, ACN (Sen.Ifeanyi Araraume) has not gone to court to challenge INEC so its funny that  CPC is doing so considering how woefully the Party failed  at the Apr.26th elections.

Besides, isn’t there a Party Chairman? Typically, the Flag bearer is the one who goes to court so why have they put this cheap publicity stunt on Dr. Mezu head and why did they wait this long to go to Court? Who is really behind this?

A part of the Petition that caught my attention was were it stated that Dr.Mezu resides in Emekuku, Owerri. Last I checked, Dr.Sebastian Mezu lived in Pikesville, MD USA so, when did he move back to Nigeria? Okay ooooo! Onu’m PIM!

Back to the Petition…

Although it raised some good points, in my opinion, I consider it  frivolous.

Anyone with a genuine interest for the state would not be going to court over something as trivial as this. I also wonder why it has no mention of Hon. Emeka Nwajiuba who is the Party Flag bearer.

Leaves me wondering what kind of a ” Governor” Hon. Emeka Nwajiuba would have been. So if we had voted you in  Sir, does it mean that Dr.Mezu’s Children who are obviously  riding on your back to push their Father into the spotlight would have been the ones running the Cabinet for you?

Take control Sir, your Deputy should never outshine you. You are the flag bearer and You should call the shots. No Dulling!

With that out of the way…

Please:

If anyone knows Dr.Sebastian Mezu’s daughter, Dr.Mrs. K_____ ______, could you please advise her to stop harrasing the blogger of this web page?.

The other day, she called threatening and throwing curses at me. Imagine telling me to “shut the f**k up”,  Inu kwa?

Not everybody has to support your Father, Madam. When you start fighting people like that, you end up making more enemies for your Father. She warned me that it was going to get “MESSY” (in her own words) so, I am scared for my life because I don’t know the extent she intends to go in dealing with me. Therefore, I am using this medium to reach out to anyone  who knows her to plead with her and announce to the public just incase anything happens to me, the Government should hold her  responsible!. Thanks.

______________________________


CPC IMO STATE FILES A RESTRAINING ORDER AND TEMPORARY AND PERMANENT INJUNCTION AGAINST THE HOLDING OF SUPPLEMENTARY ELECTIONS IN IMO STATE ON MAY, 6TH 2011
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ORIGINATING SUMMONS UNDER
(O.3 r.9)
IN THE FEDERAL HIGH COURT OF NIGERIA
IN THE OWERRI JUDICIAL DIVISION
HOLDEN AT OWERRI

SUIT NO: FHC/OW/CS/135/11
BETWEEN:

DR.  SEBASTIAN  OKECHU
KWU MEZU

PLAINTIFF

INDEPENDENT NATIONAL ELECTORAL COMMISSION
DEFENDANT

ORIGINATING SUMMONS
COMPLAINT AND PETITION FOR A RESTRAINING ORDER AND TEMPORARY AND PERMANENT INJUNCTION AGAINST THE HOLDING OF SUPPLEMENTARYELECTIONS IN IMO STATE

Dr.Sebastian O. Mezu


Petitioner herein, Dr. S, Okechukwu Mezu, respectfully seeks this Honourable Court’s intervention in equity, and respectfully aver and allege:

Petitioner is a citizen of Imo State, Nigeria and the Deputy Gubernatorial Candidate, Congress for Progressive Change (CPC) in the Imo State Gubernatorial Elections held on April 26, 2011.  The Petitioner is a registered voter in Imo State and voted in the Governorship election of April 26, 2011. The Petitioner is a Publisher and Businessman and resides at Emekuku, Owerri North LGA, Imo State, Nigeria Candidate,

  • Pursuant to its authority under the Electoral Act of 2006, the Independent National Electoral Commission (“INEC”) set the date for the gubernatorial election in Imo State as April 26, 2011.
  • Pursuant to section 178(2) of the Constitution of Nigeria, elections to the office of Governor of a State, “are to be held on a date not earlier than sixty days and not later than thirty days before the expiration of the term of the office of the last holder of that office.”
  • As the term of the current Governor of Imo State, Ikedi Ohakim, expires at 12 p.m. on May 29, 2011, the INEC was required to set the date of the election as no later than April 29, 2011.
  • The original election, which took place on April 26, 2011, fulfilled this constitutional mandate.
  • The election was scheduled to take place on April 26th in all 27 Local Government Areas in Imo State.
  • Electoral results have been confirmed in 23 of 27 of the Local Government Areas.
  • However, the INEC has ruled the results of the election “inconclusive” in the remaining four Local Government Areas, those four being Ngor-Okpalla, Mbaitoli, Oguta and Ohaji/Egbema.
  • Whoever has received the highest number of votes, as well as more than 25 percent of the votes in at least two-thirds of the Local Government Areas where elections were held, meets the requirements for being declared the victor under the Electoral law of 2006.
  • Instead, INEC declared the entire Imo State gubernatorial election “inconclusive” and refused to certify a victor.
  • To the contrary, INEC, on April 29, 2011, scheduled supplementary elections on Friday, May 6, 2011, to be held in the aforementioned four Local Government Areas of Ngor-Okpalla, Mbaitoli, Oguta and Ohaji/Egbema, as well as in Orji Ward in Owerri North Local Government Area.
  • INEC has not announced what rendered the election in these areas “inconclusive.”
  • INEC has not explained why the votes cast (if cast) in these five localities cannot be counted.
  • Rather than count, or recount, the votes cast in the aforementioned localities, INEC has chosen to impose supplementary elections for which there is no statutory or constitutional authority, and which directly contravenes section 178(2) of the Nigerian Constitution.
  • As stated above, any election that takes place later than April 29, 2011 is prohibited by the mandatory language of the Constitution’s section 178(2), which states that, “An election to the office of Governor of a State shall be held on a date not earlier than sixty days and not later than thirty days before the expiration of the term of office of the last holder of that office.” (Emphasis supplied).
  • Moreover, a constitutionally valid election already did take place, on April 26, 2011, and the INEC has provided no basis for its refusal to certify the results of that election.
  • Election results are only inconclusive unless and until votes are counted fully and accurately and all incidents of multiple voting discounted and votes forensically analysed and thumb-printing on ballot papers by same individuals eliminated and discounted; if election results are currently inconclusive, the remedy is for INEC to fulfill its statutory obligation to require a full and accurate counting of the votes.
  • Rather than fulfill this statutory mandate, INEC has ordered elections that not only violate the timing provisions established by the section 178(2) of the Constitution but that, whenever scheduled, would be in excess of INEC’s statutory authority and outside the scope of the electoral procedures contemplated by the Electoral Law of 2006.
  • Indeed, as stated in the Constitution at section 178(1), “An election to the office of Governor of a State shall be held on a date to be appointed by the Independent National Electoral Commission;” that is, a single election, not multiple elections.
  • Declaring an election “inconclusive” rather than counting all votes undermines the core values of an electoral system, in a way that undermines the constitutional basis of the Nigerian political system.
  • Threats to the electoral system of the Federal Republic of Nigeria is a matter of deepest public concern.
  • Allowing supplementary elections on May 6, 2011 in selected portions of Imo State would irreversibly undermine the legitimacy of the prior election of April 26, 2011 and all future elections in Nigeria.
  • The Plaintiff, Dr. S. Okechukwu Mezu, finally claims that having regards to section 178(2) of the Constitution of Nigeria, elections to the office of the Governor of a State, “are to be held on a date not earlier than sixty days and not later than thirty days before the expiration of the term of office of the last holder of that office” and hereby thus seeks the interpretation of this section of the Constitution and determination by the Honourable Court as to whether (1) the Independent National Electoral Commission is constitutionally and legally competent to (a) declare Imo State Governorship election held on April 26, 2011 as “inconclusive” (2) to schedule “supplementary elections” for Friday, May 6, 2011 for which there is no statutory or constitutional authority since any election that takes place later than April 29, 2011 is prohibited by the mandatory language of the Constitution’s section 178(2).

WHEREFORE, petitioner respectfully seeks immediate relief, restraining any and all attempts to hold supplementary elections, and instead seek this Court’s aid in mandating that all ballots cast on April 26, 2011 be counted in accordance with the Electoral Law of 2006.


Respectfully submitted,
Dr. S. Okechukwu Mezu
Plaintiff
pro se

Source: CPC IMOSTATE website.

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